How To Assess The Real Cost Of A Fixer-Upper

How To Assess The Real Cost Of A Fixer-Upper House
By: G. M. Filisko Published 2010-08-24 12:44:37
When you buy a fixer-upper house, you can save a ton of money, or get yourself in a financial fix.

Trying to decide whether to buy a fixer-upper house? Follow these seven steps, and you’ll know how much you can afford, how much to offer, and whether a fixer-upper house is right for you.
1. Decide what you can do yourself
TV remodeling shows make home improvement work look like a snap. In the real world, attempting a difficult remodeling job that you don’t know how to do will take longer than you think and can lead to less-than-professional results that won’t increase the value of your fixer-upper
Make sure you have the time, skills, and desire to embark on home improvement projects before buying a fixer-upper house.
house.
Do you really have the skills to do it? Some tasks, like stripping wallpaper and painting, are relatively easy. Others, like electrical work, can be dangerous when done by amateurs.
Do you really have the time and desire to do it? Can you take time off work to renovate your fixer-upper house? If not, will you be stressed out by living in a work zone for months while you complete projects on the weekends?
2. Price the cost of repairs and remodeling before you make an offer
Get your contractor into the house to do a walk-through, so he can give you a written cost estimate on the tasks he’s going to do.
If you’re doing the work yourself, price the supplies.
Either way, tack on 10% to 20% to cover unforeseen problems that often arise with a fixer-upper house.
3. Check permit costs
Ask local officials if the work you’re going to do requires a permit and how much that permit costs. Doing work without a permit may save money, but it’ll cause problems when you resell your home.
Decide if you want to get the permits yourself or have the contractor arrange for them. Getting permits can be time-consuming and frustrating. Inspectors may force you to do additional work, or change the way you want to do a project, before they give you the permit.
Factor the time and aggravation of permits into your plans.
4. Doublecheck pricing on structural work
If your fixer-upper home needs major structural work, hire a structural engineer for $500 to
$700 to inspect the home before you put in an offer so you can be confident you’ve uncovered and conservatively budgeted for the full extent of the problems.  Get written estimates for repairs before you commit to buying a home with structural issues. Don’t purchase a home that needs major structural work unless:
You’re getting it at a steep discount You’re sure you’ve uncovered the extent of the problem You know the problem can be fixed You have a binding written estimate for the repairs
5. Check the cost of financing
Be sure you have enough money for a downpayment, closing costs, and repairs without draining your savings.
If you’re planning to fund the repairs with a home equity or home improvement loan: Get yourself pre-approved for both loans before you make an offer.
Make the deal contingent on getting both the purchase money loan and the renovation money loan, so you’re not forced to close the sale when you have no loan to fix the house.
Consider the Federal Housing Administration’s Section 203(k) program, which lets qualified purchasers wrap up to $35,000 into their mortgages to upgrade their home before they move in.
6. Calculate your fair purchase offer
Take the fair market value of the property (what it would be worth if it were in good condition and remodeled to current tastes) and subtract the upgrade and repair costs.
For example: Your target fixer-upper house has a 1960s kitchen, metallic wallpaper, shag carpet, and high levels of radon in the basement.
Your comparison house, in the same subdivision, sold last month for $200,000. That house had a newer kitchen, no wallpaper, was recently recarpeted, and has a radon mitigation system in its basement.
The cost to remodel the kitchen, remove the wallpaper, carpet the house, and put in a radon mitigation system is $40,000. Your bid for the house should be $160,000.
Ask your real estate agent if it’s a good idea to share your cost estimates with the sellers, to prove your offer is fair.
7. Include inspection contingencies in your offer
Don’t rely on your friends or your contractor to eyeball your fixer-upper house. Hire pros to do common inspections like:
Home inspection. This is key in a fixer-upper assessment. The home inspector will uncover hidden issues in need of replacement or repair. You may know you want to replace those 1970s kitchen cabinets, but the home inspector has a meter that will detect the water leak behind them.

Most home inspection contingencies let you go back to the sellers and ask them to do the repairs, or give you cash at closing to pay for the repairs. The seller can also opt to simply back out of the deal, as can you, if the inspection turns up something you don’t want to deal with. If that happens, this isn’t the right fixer-upper house for you. Go back to the top of this list and start again.

Advertisements

About Ron Jesser Realtor

I'm All About Real Estate And I Know The Desert! After 14 years of selling, I better!   When selecting a Realtor or real estate agent, a thorough knowledge of the community, strong negotiation skills, and a commitment to excellent service are all skills you’ll want on your side of the table. Experience counts!

 With great experience as a Palm Springs Realtor and extensive knowledge as a Realtor servicing Rancho Mirage, Cathedral City, Palm Desert, La Quinta, and Indio, I help both buyers and sellers meet their real estate objectives. I will work tirelessly on your behalf by being available to you when you need me to answer questions, provide information or ensure our deal is progressing smoothly; by having a solid team ready to take care of any need or request that comes our way and by providing any resource necessary to make your transaction trouble free. Sellers—I am committed to selling your home or property in a timely fashion and at the highest possible price. If you are interested in receiving a free home valuation, I encourage you to fill out my free Home Valuation Form or check out my Dream Home Finder at www.RonJesser.com Buyers—I will work with you to find your ideal home at your ideal price. Let’s narrow down what you are looking for, so we can begin the home showing process and get you a closer look at what these communities have to offer. No matter what it takes, your next home buying or home selling experience will be an enjoyable and successful one because I will be doing the work for you. And by working tirelessly on your behalf, as a team we will make your next home buying or home selling experience an enjoyable and successful one. 
 Remember—I'm not here just to find you a home. I'm here to help you find a life you will love! Thank you for considering me as your Realtor. Please call or email me if you have any real estate questions about Greater Palm Springs. DRE# 01280106
This entry was posted in Finance/Lending, Palm Springs Lifestyle, Real Estate Sales Palm Springs, Renovations. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s